Ronn Torossian Update

News and Updates from 5WPR CEO Ronn Torossian

Maserati Takes Aim at Porsche

maserati vs porsche ronn torossian

When it comes to high-performance coupes, both Porsche and Jaguar have legions of loving and dedicated fans. But now, according to Ronn Torossian, there’s a new player on the scene that should create a rather interesting automotive love triangle. Maserati recently introduced the Alfieri coupe, a 2016 model that seems clearly aimed at stealing market share from Porsche’s vaunted 911 and Jag’s adored F-Type. When Maserati presented a version of the Alfieri at the recent Geneva Motor Show, high-performance car fans ignited.

Some of the reasons to love the Alfieri include 404 horsepower right out of the gate, with options that can crank that power up to either 444 or an asphalt boiling 510. Fortunately, the standard all-wheel drive will allow the Alfieri to hug that scorched asphalt every inch of the way. Not that long ago, Maserati pledged to move 75,000 cars a year by 2018, but brand reps insist the Alfieri is not the car to make that happen. Instead, their new performance coupe is slated to be a low-volume model, more of a shock and awe campaign to illuminate the entire Maserati line.

Take note, brand managers. This is an excellent strategy when you are repping a brand with a perennial seat on the outside looking in. Yes, Maserati has a dedicated core of fans, but not nearly the raving and raging fan base of its closest competitors. This is partly because Maserati has always been about “exclusivity and luxury.” It’s the brand that doesn’t want to be popular with all the people…just all the right people. Still, those “exclusive” people tend to have the cash to be very selective, and they often buy with flash and panache in mind…at least as much as performance. Given that market reality, Maserati has to step out of its We’re For the Select Few mold and aggressively go after those coveted “few.”

The Alfieri should get them looking, more than once, not just at the Alfieri but at the entire Maserati line. Exposing the “right people” to all that you offer can help raise the water level across your entire brand. You will attract potential customers who may not want your “grabber” product, but might fall in love with something else you offer…something they would not have otherwise given a first, much less a second, thought.

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AOL Founder: Now is the ‘Pivotal Point’ of the Internet

aol founder ronn torossian

Speaking to a crowd of thousands of tech junkies and industry entrepreneurs at the annual South By Southwest (SXSW) music, film and interactive technology festival, keynote speaker and former AOL CEO Steve Case stated that the world is at a “pivotal point” of the internet as the Web enters its third wave.

The first wave, of which Case’s AOL was at the forefront, ran from 1985 through 2000 or so and consisted of the internet’s rise in popular culture from a closed-off network used by governments and educators to a utility-like commodity billions depend on every day. When the internet hit its second wave around the turn of the millennium, large companies such as Google, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter and eBay rose to power, further incorporating the Web into everyday life.

Now we are at a crossroads, Case says, as the third wave begins. This new era will be characterized by new disruptive companies tackling more areas of daily life: food, healthcare, transportation and energy, among others. Those entrepreneurs who are successful will need to “understand the battle ahead.”

Fueling the transition will be a greater access to capital than even in Silicon Valley’s high-flying “bubble” days. Crowdsourcing platforms such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo have democratized the funding of new tech companies and products, allowing developers to connect directly with those interested in a new idea. Meanwhile, venture capitalist firms and large companies have embraced the idea of activist investing, using the commercial sector toward the public’s greater good. Case used the examples of Toms and Etsy as two cutting-edge for-profit companies who have managed to help communities worldwide through activism and giving back.

Finally, Silicon Valley, today’s worldwide center of the tech world, will no longer have a monopoly on the brightest minds and most promising companies as new regional hubs in the United States and elsewhere pop up to serve an expanding industry. In Kansas City, Pittsburgh and the North Carolina coast, as well as regions in the Middle East and Africa, this process has already begun. A decentralized tech industry will encourage innovation, competition and a reformatting of tech culture that has become somewhat dysfunctional, Case says.

AOL took 10 years to reach 1 million users, a feat today’s most-successful social networks and smartphone apps accomplish in a period of days or weeks. The Web as a communication medium has come a long way since the U.S. government legalized its commercial use in 1992, and Case says the new era is just getting started.

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Singers Get Crunchy over Granola

 

haulin oats pr

Imitation may be the best form of flattery, but copyright infringement will get you nowhere but court. That, says Ronn Torossian, is a lesson an NYC-based granola company is learning the hard way. Powerhouse singer-songwriters Hall & Oates are suing a Brooklyn-based granola company for selling a brand of granola called “Haulin’ Oats.”

Hall & Oates took the company to federal court to stop them from selling the product, stating that to do so violates their trademark and damages their brand. The company in question, Early Bird Foods, has yet to comment on the suit in the media, but has decided to take another tack. They offered a discount on their product online where customers use a coupon code based on a hit Hall & Oates song. Definitely have to give them credit for wit, but that promotional stunt may just backfire.

This is the second time Hall & Oates have sued a company for marketing a brand labeled “Haulin’ Oats.” Back in 2014, the duo learned a Kentucky-based company was selling oatmeal under the same name. They approached the company and were able to work out a deal. Now, Haulin’ Oats brand is available in five states.

This, of course, is the right way to end an obvious trademark infringement. If you are absolutely set on using the name or a derivative of it, work out a deal with the owners and sell to your heart’s content. While flouting the rule might position Early Bird as the heroic Little Guy fighting the Power, in the end they may just end up getting the worm.

Guess this rules out Ben & Jerry doing that long awaited “Sara Swirls” flavor.

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Why Snapchat is Exploding

RONN TOROSSIAN SNAPCHAT

According to reports in TechCrunch, social media upstart Snapchat is looking to bring in more than $500 million in new investment. To that end, the company has been wooing groups that include Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba and Saudi investor Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal. The amount they are seeking nearly matches the $648 million the company has already received to date. While the companies in question are not talking to reporters, Bloomberg reported that Alibaba has agreed to invest $200 million in Snapchat.

A couple of interesting notes here. First, Alibaba, as an e-commerce company, has an opportunity to hedge its ‘net interests while also expanding them in what some have called the “uncertain” marketplace of social media. Further, Prince Alwaleed has also invested in Twitter, long described as a competitor – or even a proto version of – Snapchat. Spreading investments across competing brands is nothing new to Alwaleed. His firm also holds interests in AOL, Apple, Motorola and Fox.

All this cross-investing and funding of competing brands might be seen as either bet-hedging or yet more evidence that the ‘net really is the Wild West. The former could certainly be a fair assessment, but the latter is less so.

Yes, the Internet still qualifies as both a technology and financial powder keg, both a realm of almost limitless possibility and an environment with all the loving nurture of outer space. There is certainly plenty of cash to be made, but many fortunes will be shattered along the way. So, what’s the best way for a company to set itself up to look enough like a winner in order to get the funding it needs to become what it aspires to be?

Again, Snapchat provides a solid answer. The platform began with a proven commodity then tweaked it just enough to be seen as completely distinct in the consumer marketplace. That distinction appealed to a wide and enthusiastic demographic, which flocked to the product in droves. When their experience exceeded expectations, they kept coming back for more. Quick success and a rapidly expanding fan base equals investor gold. Add to that a consumer base that either is not aware it IS the product or does not care, and you have a winning combination.

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A look at #GivingTuesday

ronn torossian giving tuesday Have you ever heard of #throwbackthursday? How about #womancrushwednesday? Chances are you’ve picked up on plenty of these catchy phrases. Our online lexicon has been inundated with meaningless hashtags, but a campaign with a cause has emerged in the last few years. #GivingTuesday was started in 2012 by the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan and the United Nations Foundation to garner support for charity and philanthropic organizations during the holiday season. Our economy is especially consumer driven after Thanksgiving.

As an answer to that, GivingTuesday falls on the Tuesday after Black Friday and Cyber Monday annually in an attempt to remind consumers to give back to those in need. The organizers hope that in time GivingTuesday will become a holiday tradition. GivingTuesday is mainly a social media campaign, relying on the use of hashtags in the hopes of reaching viral proportions. The movement even created the #unselfie, a clever hashtag to use when tagging photos to show your support of GivingTuesday on platforms such as Instagram and Facebook. GivingTuesday support has nearly doubled every year since the campaign began in 2012. With over 20,000 charitable partners in 2014, the third annual event was the most successful yet.

The number of organizations partnered with GivingTuesday doubled from the amount in 2013, and people from 68 different countries participated. According to GivingTuesday.org, donations rose 63% over the previous year’s totals, and 90% from 2012′s numbers. The hashtag #GivingTuesday was used on Twitter 754,600 times and was a trending topic for 11 hours. #unselfie was tagged in over 7500 photos and tweeted nearly 40,000 times. There was a 101% increase in mobile transactions compared to the previous year, proving that the heavy use of social media influence in the campaign is paying off. GivingTuesday received donations from all 50 states in its first year, and has now received worldwide support in its third year. Notable organizations such as UNICEF and the American Red Cross have joined ranks with many other charities large and small.

The wide range of giving options makes donation more appealing, meaningful and personalized for the individuals who participate. With every year skyrocketing past the previous year’s totals, this holiday may have the best show of support yet. So, before you spend all of your holiday budget on Black Friday or Cyber Monday, remember GivingTuesday and start your holiday off with a selfless act. This year’s GivingTuesday is on December 1st, 2015.

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The Browns have a Bright Orange PR Problem

ronn torossian on cleveland browns public relations

Looks, it’s a cinch that football fans are not Cleveland Browns fans because of the uniforms. The Browns’ orange, brown and white scheme is only slightly less underwhelming than their cellar-dwelling on-field performances. The only disappointment more consistent than these duds is the Browns’ need for a quarterback.

That dynamic led to a highly anticipated and widely marketed rebranding initiative. The campaign took two years to complete, and the Browns recently unveiled their new logo to replace the iconic but somewhat tired orange helmet … the new result? Wait for it (the fans did for two years) … another orange helmet. Essentially, the team went from orange peel orange to traffic cone orange. That’s pretty much it.

Well, according to some wits on social media they also gave “The Dawg” rabies. Not an unfair commentary by any means. And the rest of the PR fallout from this decision? Incendiary. Even fans growing accustomed to disappointment seem to feel punked this time around.

Logic says, your reaction better be as big as your promotion. When you make legions of some of the most loyal fans in the history of sports wait for two years to experience hope in the form of a brand transformation and you come up with … not much transformation at all … it comes off as not trying. As taking them for granted. As … not putting enough care into putting out a winning product.

That’s not to say every logo is a winner. When the Tampa Bay Buccaneers debuted in the late 1970s, they came with an orange popsicle color combination and a flamboyant Errol-Flynn-Mustachioed pirate (of Penzance). Fans grew to hate the logo as much as they did the on-field (lack of) performance. So the Bucs went back to the drawing board, coming up with the iconic new color scheme and pirate logo. Then they put a winning team on the field and their fan base grew by massive numbers, everyone sporting the cool new gear. The creamsicle days are saved for irony and throwback games.

The Browns had the same chance. Judging by their fans’ reactions, they blew it … again.

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PR Winners and Losers at the Oscars

Ronn Torossian 2015 Oscars

The 87th Academy Awards show is now a part of the history books. “Birdman” was the big winner of the night, taking home four wins in the nine categories that it was nominated for. While it is always fun to take a look at the winners and losers, it is even more interesting to see who were the biggest winners and losers in the public relations department. Every year has some presenters and winners who do amazing or head-scratching things while they have the spotlight, and this year was no different. Here is a look at the biggest PR winners and losers for this year’s Oscars.

Winner – Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu

Even people who were outraged that “Boyhood” lost had to admire the graciousness that Gonzalez Inarritu displayed when he accepted his awards. His joking moment where he said he was wearing Michael Keaton’s tighty whiteys from the film was just the kind of hilarity that was far too infrequent in this year’s broadcast.

Loser – Sean Penn

While anyone who really knows Sean Penn realizes he is about as liberal and far from a racist as you can get, that didn’t stop social media from erupting when Penn asked jokingly, “Who gave this gave this son of a $*%#! his green card?” when he was presenting the award for Best Picture to Gonzalez Inarittu. Gonzalez Inarritu directed Peen in the film “21 Grams,” and the two are good friends. He even said backstage that he thought Penn’s joke was “hilarious.” However, the PR damage to Penn’s reputation is undeniable, but he will likely recover quickly.

Winner – Patricia Arquette

The brilliant actress was the only person to take home any hardware from the tragically underappreciated “Boyhood,” and Patricia Arquette made the most of it. During arguably the greatest speech of the evening, she delivered an impassioned plea for equality for women. In particular, she turned a spotlight on the wage inequality that exists for women today. Her fiery speech got the women in the auditorium as well as a number of the men on their feet. Meryl Streep in particular was cheering loudly.

Loser – Neil Patrick Harris

People are already arguing about how Neil Patrick Harris’s performance was as host, but the majority seem to feel he fell flat. He had a number of strange moments, including the running gag with his prediction box that aggravated both people at the show as well as those watching at home. He also had some uncomfortable moments with the few African-American attendees, including both Oprah and “Selma” star David Oyelowo. Coming out on the stage in his underwear was awkward as could be. It was definitely not in keeping with the classy presence an Oscar host needs. Perhaps his worst moment was when he made a tasteless joke about a winner’s dress moments after she made an impassioned plea for suicide victims. It is doubtful that he will ever get asked back to host.

Winner – JK Simmons

The career character actor was a shoo-in for Best Supporting Actor for his role in “Whiplash,” and Simmons’s speech was one of the best of the evening. His impassioned plea for everyone watching to call their parents was one of the most memorable moments of the evening, and it will doubtless gain him lots of new advertising gigs like his commercials with Farmers Insurance.

Loser – John Travolta

Travolta was arguable the biggest PR loser of the night. First, Travolta crept up on Scarlett Johannsson on the red carper to steal a kiss from the obviously uncomfortable starlet. On stage, he was paired with Idina Menzel, whose name he famously butchered during last year’s show. He got her name right this year, but that didn’t make up for his uncomfortable chin-grabbing of her with a billion people watching. It was by far the most awkward moment of the show, and his already shaky reputation is even shakier now.

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Marcus vs Jameis at the Combine

marcus vs jameis public relations

In the lead up to the NFL Scouting Combine, the prognosticators grew louder than ever. Which quarterback would emerge from the Combine with the best shot at being number one overall in the next NFL draft? While, in the past, some top prospects chose to forego the annual talent showcase, this season does not lend itself to that luxury.

There are two quarterbacks in this draft who are widely considered to be all but equal in ability and intangibles. Marcus Mariota and Jameis Winston have been endlessly compared, but the jury is still out on who is the best. Recently, Mariota was quoted as saying he doesn’t compare himself to other players. Well, if that’s the case, then he is the only guy who doesn’t.

There is no doubt that Mariota and Winston are both gifted athletes and excellent quarterbacks. Even criticisms about how each might function at the next level are offered with stacks of caveats and “yeah, buts.” Winston is considered to be the most “ready” to step into a pro style offense. But Mariota comes with his own huge upside.

Where will each end up in the draft? Likely, the teams at the top of the draft board have already made up their minds. But the Combine is an opportunity to either secure that decision or give them second thoughts. The strategy for both outcomes is the same. Not only to achieve peak personal performance but also outperform The Other Guy.

At the Combine, this competition is distilled, obviously, but it is the same competition every brand faces every day. Whatever you do, your customers and prospects are always comparing and contrasting your “value” with that of your competition. Just as much as a quarterback’s stock depends on the scuttlebutt surrounding him, the value of your brand will be impacted by the nature of the message related to your brand. If that message is confused or mediocre, you can expect customers to look elsewhere. But if your PR message is poignant, positive and focused, you can expect your “stock” to rise.

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NFL “Bully” gets one last Chance with the Bills

Icognito’s Miami Dolphins teammate Jonathan

Some have called him a bully, others say he’s just the kind of tough guy the NFL needs, but public relations has not been kind to Richie Incognito. As Ronn Torossian explains, now the veteran offensive lineman is on what even he has described as his last chance to continue his NFL career.

Incognito has been a polarizing figure in the NFL for years. A hard-nosed player with a well-established mean streak, that reputation became cable news fodder after Icognito’s Miami Dolphins teammate Jonathan Martin quit the NFL after bullying from Incognito. While some tried to classify events as the hazing of a teammate to toughen him up, others took a much more negative view of proceedings.

Now that he has signed with the Buffalo Bills, even Incognito says this might be his final opportunity to salvage both his reputation and his career.

Recently, Incognito spoke to NFL.com, saying he had learned from his mistakes and the whole situation. “I needed to respect those around me more and I needed to realize I may find things funny that others find offensive. This whole learning process was about becoming self-aware. About becoming a better person/teammate/leader.”

According to the statement, both Incognito and the Bills are in agreement that this is an opportunity the player should consider his last. But it is also a chance to bring attention to a sensitive subject. “I want to prove to people I’m not a racist jerk. We talked about possible ways to turn this situation around and ways to impact the community.”

For a brand – and make no mistake pro sports players are brands unto themselves – hanging on dearly to the end of his last rope, Incognito is saying all the right things. It’s certainly possible that he’s always been a pretty decent guy whose previous mistakes were taken out of context and over examined. That can certainly happen in today’s voracious 24-7 news cycle. Then again, this might just be a chance to see if a guy can change his ways.

It’s an opportunity not everyone receives. Hope he makes the most of it.

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Kalashnikov Is Booming And Selling Very Well – Despite Russia’s Crisis

Kalashnikov

Russia’s economy is in a downward spiral, but that certainly doesn’t mean it’s going poorly for everyone. There is however one particular Russian brand’s continued success, despite the nation’s economic “crisis.”

In the past few months, the world has been watching Russia’s economy suffer from plummeting oil prices and sanctions. Many Russian businesses have suffered greatly as a result, but the manufacturer of the world famous AK-47 assault rifle is not having any of that. Kalashnikov is doing well, doubling production in 2014 and posting $45 million in revenue, up 28% from 2013. Better still, the company has posted a net profit for the first time in seven years. Right, and this is all happening IN SPITE OF the fact that Kalashnikov was one of the first companies hit with sanctions after Russia invaded Ukraine.

How is this possible? Well, Kalashnikov decided that, if they couldn’t sell in one place, they would look for other options. And that strategy has paid off in spades. Instead of fretting over sanctions and a lagging economy, Kalashnikov worked on opening up new markets in Africa and Asia, pursuing regions with huge demand and insufficient supply.

Add to this strategy an already rock solid reputation for making a strong, reliable product that nearly anyone can use with very little training, and you have a sure recipe for success.

The PR lessons here are multifaceted. First, Kalashnikov was ready. They had spent decades building a solid reputation with current and prospective customers. Further, the brand always kept a close eye on emerging markets. Then, when the moment came when the risk was mitigated by the potential return, they were ready to surge forward. Because strong public relations allows you to skip much of the sales process, the company did not suffer from the loss of business in other areas. They just stepped into new markets and thrived. Why? Simply put, they were respected, and they were prepared. What about you?

Ronn Torossian is the CEO of 5WPR and understands the power of taboo in public relations.

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